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Pat Quinn’s Broken Promises

 

 As Pat Quinn prepares to deliver an election year budget speech, Illinois voters should be wary of anything that comes out of the governor’s mouth. His governorship has been full of broken promises and failure. Voters beware, below are a just a few examples:

Taxes

The Promise: “On the campaign trail, Gov. Pat Quinn told voters he’d veto any income tax hike that would raise Illinois’ rate over 4 percent.” (Mike Riopell and Kerry Lester, “Despite Campaign Promise, Quinn Will Sign Tax Increase,” Daily Herald, 1/12/11) The Reality: Quinn “sign[ed] into law a plan to raise the rate by 2 percentage points, to 5 percent. That’ll raise individual income taxes by 66 percent, compared to the 33 percent he said was his limit. The taxes on businesses also will increase — from 4.8 percent to 7 percent.” (Mike Riopell and Kerry Lester, “Despite Campaign Promise, Quinn Will Sign Tax Increase,” Daily Herald, 1/12/11)

Jobs

The Promise: “I get up every morning, my number one job is to try to help people get jobs in Illinois. Good jobs that can support a family.” (Quinn For Illinois web video on Jobs, Jobs, Jobs: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ViNfFbXkmqo) “Our job recovery bill will create 400,000 jobs… When I get up every day I work on that issue of getting our economy back on track” (Quinn video statement to ABC 7: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kisEvjk7Nt4) “In the past 12 months we’ve created more jobs than any other state in the Midwest.” (Post Tax Hike Press Conference via Capitol Fax: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2kcieIEyfQ) “We’ve reduced our unemployment rate in the past year by 2 percentage points and I’d like to continue to see that go down and down until we get to where we want to be as far as jobs.” (Post Tax Hike Press Conference via Capitol Fax: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2kcieIEyfQ) The Reality: Illinois has lost more than 85,000 jobs since Pat Quinn took office. (Bureau of Labor Statistics, Accessed 3/23/14) Illinois’ jobless rate has gone up more in the last 5 years than any other state in the nation. (Illinois Policy Institute) 40,000 More Citizens Of Illinois Are In Poverty Now Than When Quinn Took Office:

  • The Poverty Rate Has Increased From 12.3 Percent The Year Before Quinn Took Office To 12.6 Percent In 2012. (U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, 2013 Annual Social And Economic Supplement, Accessed 1/30/14)

Income In Illinois Is Falling:

  • Median Household Income Has Fallen By $4,385 (7%) In Illinois Since 2008, Dropping To $55,137 In 2012. (U.S. Census Bureau, 2012 American Community Survey, Accessed 1/30/14)
  • Per Capita Income Fell By $1,972 (6%) In Illinois Since 2008, Dropping To $28,741 In 2012. (U.S. Census Bureau, 2012 American Community Survey, Accessed 1/30/14)

Education

The Promise: “We have to invest in education. We have to be custodians of the future.” (Quinn video statement to ABC 7: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kisEvjk7Nt4) The Reality: Pat Quinn has cut elementary and secondary education funding by more than $600 million. (CGFA 2014 Budget Summary p. 165)

Overdue Bills

The Promise: “The next four years are a period of recovery. We have some temporary tax increases that are designed to pay our bills, get Illinois back on fiscal sound footing and make sure our state has a strong economy…so the revenue that will be raised by the income tax based on ability to pay is designed to make sure that we do pay our bills.” (Post Tax Hike Press Conference via Capitol Fax: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2kcieIEyfQ) The Reality: As of February, Illinois still had a bill backlog of nearly $6 billion. (Governor’s Office of Management and Budget)

Term Limits

The Promise: “In fall 1993, then-state Treasurer Quinn proposed a constitutional amendment to limit statewide officials to eight years. Quinn, who was running for secretary of state at the time, contended that incumbency had insulated politicians from voters. State lawmakers didn’t put that question on the ballot, so Quinn and his troops conducted a petition drive to limit legislators to eight years in office. In a July 1994 letter to the Tribune, Quinn wrote that action was needed to “break the grip of incumbency gridlock and put the voters back in charge of our government.” He contended then that “action on vital subjects” is yielded to “the re-election needs of political incumbents.” (Monique Garcia and Rick Pearson, “Quinn Won’t Pledge to Make Next Term His Last,” Chicago Tribune, 12/18/13) The Reality: Pat Quinn “opposes” the term limits ballot initiative. (Rod Thomson, “Little Agreement to be Found on Term Limits,” Illinois News Network 10/12/13)